LAWTON CHURCH OF GOD, LAWTON OKLAHOMA

Home   About Us   Holiness Library   Bible Prophecy   Listen to Sermons  History of the Holiness Movement   Early English Bibles   Bible Studies   Links

 

 

 

 

SYSTEMATIC THEOLOGY

 

By

 

JOHN MILEY, D.D., LL.D.

 

Professor of Systematic Theology

Drew Theological Seminary, Madison, New Jersey

 

1892

 

 

TABLE OF CONTENTS.

 

 

 

INTRODUCTION.

   

I. Theology.

II. Sources of Theology.

              

III. Scientific Basis of Theology.

               

IV. Systemization a Right of Theology.

               

V. Method of Systemization.

 

 

PART I.— THEISM

 

 

 

CHAPTER I. PRELIMINARY QUESTIONS.

 

CHAPTER II. PROOFS OF THEISM.

 

CHAPTER III. ANTITHEISTIC THEORIES.

 

CHAPTER IV. ANTITHEISTIC AGNOSTICISM.

 

 

 

PART II.— THEOLOGY.

 

 

This part is for the discussion of truths relating directly to God. For the representation of these truths we place at its head the single term theology. Some think that its modern use in a much wider sense renders it inappropriate for such representation. Hence we often find with it some interpretative phrase or limiting word. We thus have, in form, theology—doctrine of God; oftener, theology proper. This is neither graceful in style nor definitive in sense. Appropriateness still lies in the etymological sense. Theology thus means a doctrine of God, and may properly represent all the truths more directly relating to him. Primarily it was used in this sense. We so use it here; and we thus secure a symmetry of terms not otherwise attainable for the several parts of systematic theology.

 

CHAPTER I. GOD IN BEING.

 

CHAPTER II. GOD IN PERSONALITY.

 

CHAPTER III. GOD’S ATTRIBUTES.

 

CHAPTER IV. DIVINE PREDICABLES NOT DISTINCTIVELY ATTRIBUTES.

 

CHAPTER V. GOD IN TRINITY.

 

CHAPTER VI. THE SON OF GOD.

 

CHAPTER VII. THE HOLY SPIRIT.

 

CHAPTER VIII. TRUTH OF THE TRINITY.

 

CHAPTER IX. GOD IN CREATION.

 

CHAPTER X. GOD IN PROVIDENCE.

 

 

 

PART III.— ANTHROPOLOGY.

 

 

The one term, anthropology, has both a theological and a scientific use. Theological anthropology deals with the facts of man’s moral and religious constitution and history as related to Christian doctrine, while scientific anthropology deals with his specifical characteristics. However, in the latter case there are wide variations. With naturalists anthropology means the natural history of the race. With German philosophers the term is so broadened as to include psychology, sociology, and ethics, together with anatomy and physiology.[1] Hence in works with the common title of anthropology there is a great difference in the range of topics. In the wider range some things are included which belong also to theology. However, enough difference still remains for the division into a scientific and a theological anthropology.

It should be noted that this distinction simply differentiates topics, not methods of treatment. It is not meant that the treatment of scientific anthropology is any more scientific than the treatment of theological anthropology.

In a philosophy of religion all the facts which concern the moral and religious constitution and history of man might properly be called anthropological. This would greatly broaden the term, as we found it broadened in the scientific sphere. In an evangelical theology, however, the view of anthropology is largely determined by its relation to the mediation of Christ. Man is thus viewed as in need of redemption and salvation. This need arises from the fact of sin, or the common sinful state of man. This state is the chief question of doctrinal anthropology. It is, in accordance with theological formulation, the doctrine of sin. But a proper treatment of this doctrine requires a previous treatment of primitive man, his probation and fall, and the consequence of that moral lapse to the race. With this question of consequence the further question of our relation to the Adamic probation arises—whether it was such as to involve us in the guilt and punishment of Adam’s sin. There is still a further question—whether the common native depravity, as consequent to the Adamic fall, has in itself the demerit of sin. We have thus indicated, in a summary way, the leading questions of anthropology in a system of Christian doctrine. In their discussion they will appear in their proper order, and with more exact formulation.

These questions are not simply of speculative interest, or merely incidental to a system of Christian theology, but intrinsic and determining. In any system, whether evangelical or rationalistic, the anthropology and soteriology must be in scientific accordance. If we start from the side of anthropology, our soteriology must follow accordingly. If we proceed in the reverse order, a like consequence must follow for our anthropology. If our present state is the same as our primitive state, if there is no moral lapse of the race, and no common native depravity, there can be no need of a redemptive mediation in Christ, nor of regeneration through the agency of the Holy Spirit. To allege any such necessity is to assume an original constitution of man in a state of moral evil and ruin. No theory of Christianity can rationally admit such an implication. With a moral lapse of the race and a common native depravity, we need the redemptive mediation of Christ, and the offices of the Holy Spirit in our regeneration and spiritual life. For the reality of these facts we require the divinity of the Christ, the personality and divinity of the Holy Spirit. With these truths we require the truth of the divine Trinity. On a denial of the primitive lapse and moral ruin of the race, all these great truths may be dismissed. They can have no proper place in theology. So intrinsic and determining is the doctrine of anthropology in a system of Christian theology. “Original sin is the foundation upon which we must build the teaching of Christian theology. This universal evil is the primary fact, the leading truth whence the science takes its departure; and it is this which forms the peculiar distinction of theology from sciences which work their own advancement by the powers of reason.”[2]


[1] Krauth-Fleming: Vocabulary of the Philosophical Sciences, Anthropology.

[2] Melanchthon.

 

 

CHAPTER I. PRELIMINARY QUESTIONS.

 

CHAPTER II. PRIMITIVE MAN.

 

CHAPTER III. QUESTION OF PRIMITIVE HOLINESS.

 

CHAPTER IV. THE PRIMITIVE PROBATION.

 

CHAPTER V. TEMPTATION AND FALL OF MAN.

 

CHAPTER VI. DOCTRINE OF NATIVE DEPRAVITY.

 

CHAPTER VII. PROOFS OF NATIVE DEPRAVITY.

 

CHAPTER VIII. ORIGIN OF DEPRAVITY.

 

CHAPTER IX. REALISTIC MODE OF ADAMIC SIN.

 

CHAPTER X. REPRESENTATIVE MODE OF ADAMIC GUILT.

 

CHAPTER XI. GENETIC LAW OF NATIVE DEPRAVITY.

 

CHAPTER XII. DOCTRINE OF NATIVE DEMERIT.

 

 

PART IV.—CHRISTOLOGY.  

 

Christology—Χριστού λόγος—has Christ for its subject, and might properly include his divinity and subsistence in the Trinity; his incarnation and unique personality; his prophetic, priestly, and kingly offices. Such truths are central to Christianity, and determinative of what it is in itself, and in distinction from other religions. Their inclusion in Christology would give to it a very wide scope. Then, in addition to the range of its own legitimate topics, the subject is greatly broadened in its doctrinal history. Few questions in theology have been more persistently or deeply discussed. The fact is quite natural to the intrinsic importance of the subject. Besides, the discussion has been intensified by the divergences of doctrinal views of the Christ.

For the present, however, we are specially concerned with the one question of the person of Christ. This does not mean the omission of other great topics of Christology.  They must be included in a system of Christian theology because they involve fundamental truths of the system. Some of them are inseparably connected with the question of the person of Christ, but may be more appropriately discussed in other parts of the system. The question of personality is itself a subject of wide scope. It is such m the range of its own topics, and also in its doctrinal history. It is the one question of Christology which has been most in discussion. Opposing views have been maintained; and the issues thus raised have been regarded, not as matters of merely speculative interest, but as questions of the profoundest religious concern. The result is that the theories and discussions respecting the person of Christ occupy a large place in the history of Christian doctrine. Any one who wishes to study these discussions can readily find ample resources in the literature which they have produced, particularly in Corner’s great work on the development of the history of the doctrine of the person of Christ. However, systematic theology is concerned with this history only so far as it may be helpful in reaching the true doctrine.

 

 

CHAPTER I. THE PERSON OF CHRIST.

 

CHAPTER II. THE DIVINE INCARNATION.

 

CHAPTER III. CHRIST IS THEANTHROPIC.

 

CHAPTER IV. THE SYMPATHY OF CHRIST.

 

CHAPTER V. LEADING ERRORS IN CHRISTOLOGY.

 

 

PART V.—SOTERIOLOGY.

 

THE ATONEMENT IN CHRIST.

 

   

PRELIMINARIES.

 

CHAPTER I. REALITY OF ATONEMENT.

 

CHAPTER II. NECESSITY FOR ATONEMENT.

 

CHAPTER III. SCHEMES WITHOUT ATONEMENT. 

 

CHAPTER IV. THEORIES OF ATONEMENT.

 

CHAPTER V. THEORY OF MORAL INFLUENCE.

 

CHAPTER VI. THEORY OF SATISFACTION.

 

CHAPTER VII. GOVERNMENTAL THEORY.

 

CHAPTER VIII. SUFFICIENCY OF THE ATONEMENT.

 

CHAPTER IX. OBJECTIONS TO THE ATONEMENT.

 

CHAPTER X. A LESSON FOR ALL INTELLIGENCES.

 

CHAPTER XI. UNIVERSALITY OF THE ATONEMENT.

 

 

THE SALVATION IN CHRIST.

 

 

CHAPTER I. BENEFITS OF THE ATONEMENT.

 

CHAPTER II. DOCTRINAL ISSUES.

 

CHAPTER III. FREE AGENCY.

 

CHAPTER IV. FREEDOM OF CHOICE.

 

CHAPTER V. JUSTIFICATION.

 

CHAPTER VI. REGENERATION.

 

CHAPTER VII. ASSURANCE.

 

CHAPTER VIII. SANCTIFICATION.

 

CHAPTER IX. THE CHURCH.

 

 

PART VI.—ESCHATOLOGY.

 

 

Eschatology is the doctrine of the last things, and comprises the questions respecting the intermediate state, the second advent, the resurrection, the judgment, and the destinies of the evil and the good. Underlying these questions, however, is the deeper one of a future existence, without the truth of which they have for us no interest—indeed, no reality—but with the truth of which they have for us the deepest concern. In view of such facts it is proper, first of all, to consider the question of a future existence.

 

 

CHAPTER I. FUTURE EXISTENCE.

 

CHAPTER II. THE INTERMEDIATE STATE.

 

CHAPTER III. THE SECOND ADVENT.

 

CHAPTER IV. THE RESURRECTION.

 

CHAPTER V. THE JUDGMENT.

 

CHAPTER VI. FUTURE PUNISHMENT.

 

CHAPTER VII. FUTURE BLESSEDNESS.

 

 

APPENDICES.

 

 

I. INSPIRATION OF THE SCRIPTURES.

 

II. THE ANGELS.

 

III. ARMINIAN TREATMENT OF ORIGINAL SIN.